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Oldie but goldie - G. Ure & the webbots on the History Channel


towlie

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Oldie but goldie - G. Ure, a former business associate of Clif, & the webbots on the History Channel.

 

For the newbies. This is how most of us old folks first got to know them.

 

 

[video=youtube_share;3P_a_U8VRXE]

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Yeah, the part with the 'failed' 2012 doom predictions was a bit odd to watch again, after all these years. But hey, remember: It's the language that may or may not manifest, not the other way round!

 

The exception being of course (documented in the final segment of the video) having 'foreseen' the 9/11 attacks in June of that year. THAT, somehow, was 'language' + incredible, incredible 'foresight'.

 

Stuff always worth remembering, and that no one shall forget.

 

Food for your soul, newbie? I don't know.

Make it at least food for your thoughts.

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Here's a transcript of the relevant sections, which start at m. 2.11 into the viddy.

 

Speaker: Disturbing prophecies are beginning to emerge from an oracle called 'The Web-Bot Project'.

 

This program scans the world wide web for hints about the future, and reports back with prophecies that are as ambiguous as the oracles of the ancient worlds. And just as chilling.

 

G. Ure: ''One of the problems of the technology: We don't get good news out of it. Yeah, we get particulars, you know, like forecasts on an attack on Israel, or, big West Coast earthquake. ''

 

Speaker: The Web-bot Project attempts to read the unconscious mood of the world by making massive scans of the language used in hundred of thousands of websites.

 

The process involves mini-programs called spiders, or agents.

 

G. Ure: ''The spiders go out and they literally read the whole Internet. And we look for key words: Words of interest. So, every time they come across a phrase off of our seeded list, they'll take a snapshot. We aggregate typically sixty to a hundred million reads.''

 

Speaker: The web-bots began as a tool to pick stocks in the late 1990s.

 

G. Ure: ''This started off to pick the all-time high of Microsoft.''

 

Speaker: But the predictions soon became more ominous.

 

In the year of 2001, one of the web-bot programmers noticed that there were more to the results than simply financial predictions.

 

Phrases began to emerge connected to calendar days.

 

G. Ure: ''And finally he made a rather startling prediction that was that in the next 60-90 days some event would change forever how we live in America''.

 

Speaker: This prediction was made in June 2001. The web-bot developers believed it was an accurate prediction of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

 

G. Ure: ''I don't think that there's any argument 9/11 changed everybody's life. And since then, we have gone on to get this sequence of accurate predictions''.

 

Speaker: If real, the future forecasts of the web-bots are anything but rosy. And, like other oracles around the world, the web-bots also point to a global cataclysm for the year 2012.

 

G. Ure: ''I honestly don't know what is going to happen in 2012. This technology may start meshing with a lot of the other predictive things out there, like the Mayan Calendar, because we get into that period where's there an awful lot of talk about the sun, about energy, gamma ray bursts''.

 

Speaker: The web-bots suggest a destructive phenomenon eerily similar to the Mayans planetary line-up and catastrophe.

 

G. Ure: ''We could see an extraordinary solar event. Does that mean a big plasma discharge that comes out and slaps the earth around and burns a good chunk of North America except for people in caves? A little early to tell on that.''

 

Speaker: Is the high-tech oracle of the web-bots predicting the same planetary alignment and catastrophe as the Mayans, the I-Ching, Merlin, the Sybil and the Book of Revelations?

 

Or is it all just coincidence, a meaningless pattern of random events? Throughout history people have believed the end was near. And they were wrong every time.

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You're welcome, admin. One thing i haven't been able to determine in all these years: Is clif really in the ''good guys'' camp?

Don't get me wrong, I have no reason to believe that he isn't.

Still, the doubt persists, since i have also no reason to believe that he is.

What do you reckon? How is one able to find an answer to that most important of questions?

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To expand a little on this. How would you feel, as a guy who has been running the webbotforum for several years now, if one day you learnt (maybe through wikileaks) that clif is really just a tptb puppet? What makes you so sure he isn't? How would you be able to cope with the insight that you have actually helped the wrong guys with your actions? [All, of course, hypothetically speaking.]

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VaHomesteader

Think Clif is too poor to be one of their minions. I don't doubt that he has heard from them a time or two with warnings about what not to write about though.

 

I always wondered why he didn't make a fortune in the stock market since that was what the program was designed for originally. He did successfully predict the rise in Bitcoin and encouraged everyone to buy some back when they were about $10.

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Crazy Charlie

I had a dream about clif (a long while back )

I think what you see is what you get . . . ( not much is hidden ) imo

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest Unregistered
The Stranglers - North Winds Blowing

 

[video=youtube;fg-QbuMCpGA]

 

"North Winds Blowing"

 

I saw an orange robe burning

I saw a youth on fire

I saw metal machines that were turning

On a generation that hadn't yet tired

 

I heard of two generations being murdered

In a Europe that was shrouded in black

I witnessed the birth pains of new nations

When the chosen people finally went back

 

North Winds Blowing

I wish it would blow all away

North Winds Blowing

I wish they would blow all away

I wish they would blow all away

 

I saw freedom in the shape of disease

And mainly men had to quench their desire

And while a few could do just as they pleased

I saw kids whose bellies were all on fire

 

When all is dead and war is over

When hollow victory has been won

Who will join in the celebration

Of the evil that just can't be undone?

 

North Winds Blowing

I wish it would blow all away

North Winds Blowing

I wish they would blow all away

I wish they would blow all away

 

I used to dream about destruction

But now that I feel it getting near

I spend my time watching the ocean

And waves are all I want to hear

 

I wish I was a believer

I'd spend less time in being sad

So many laws against disbelieving

Don't know who's good or who's bad

 

North Winds Blowing

North Winds Blowing

North Winds Blowing

North Winds Blowing

North Winds Blowing

North Winds Blowing

North Winds Blowing

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You've got your finger on the hot button there, towlie! The $20000 question for sure.

 

Here's my guess. Because of the lack-of-provability that we are dealing with, the ambiguity, and the shifting tides of fortune and fact, we can't really know.

 

Hence, the question is more a reflection of our own stance in the world than it is a way to find out something we can concretely rest our beliefs on in real-time.

 

The people who confidently support what Clif is dishing out must have found a relevance for it. Maybe his mind works similarly to theirs, so they feel that his rantings are lucid. Clearly they gain something from the telling. The content and the presentation hold together well enough to be helpful or at least worth the price in "entertainment value". I've seen a number of people state that they add Clif in with the insights of others in the "futures" business and they make their choices from the overview.

 

I don't think that many who think he is wrong or evil or deluded hang out here, nor should they. Nobody should waste time on things they feel negative about!

 

For the rest of us, who are engaged in the muddy middle, I think Clif provides a medicinal challenge, like the herbal bitters that people take in spring to dredge the liver after the sluggishness of winter.

 

We get to find out what we think, what we believe, what we know, what we assume, what we wish were true. Sometimes that happens by finding things in his reports that match with our own thinking, sometimes it happens by contrast, and sometimes it happens because he mentions possibilities that one would never in a million years think of by oneself. The positions he takes throw light upon our own, even when we don't see things the same way. I find that very helpful.

 

 

The greatest danger is that we should "believe" Clif, "have faith" in Clif, or "obey" what we think he's saying. Those are the terms that describe religious stances that are fundamental to Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. If we are taking Clif like he is a guru or spiritual leader, then that could clearly pose a problem, because he's not, nor is he trying to be.

 

I'm comfortable with the ambiguity, but that's because I have a very schooled intuition. I trust my body's estimation, which is that Clif's motive is good. Because of that, I listen. If I didn't hear that in his voice, however, I'd not take the time.

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Guest Unregistered
You've got your finger on the hot button there, towlie! The $20000 question for sure.

 

Here's my guess. Because of the lack-of-provability that we are dealing with, the ambiguity, and the shifting tides of fortune and fact, we can't really know.

 

Hence, the question is more a reflection of our own stance in the world than it is a way to find out something we can concretely rest our beliefs on in real-time.

 

The people who confidently support what Clif is dishing out must have found a relevance for it. Maybe his mind works similarly to theirs, so they feel that his rantings are lucid. Clearly they gain something from the telling. The content and the presentation hold together well enough to be helpful or at least worth the price in "entertainment value". I've seen a number of people state that they add Clif in with the insights of others in the "futures" business and they make their choices from the overview.

 

I don't think that many who think he is wrong or evil or deluded hang out here, nor should they. Nobody should waste time on things they feel negative about!

 

For the rest of us, who are engaged in the muddy middle, I think Clif provides a medicinal challenge, like the herbal bitters that people take in spring to dredge the liver after the sluggishness of winter.

 

We get to find out what we think, what we believe, what we know, what we assume, what we wish were true. Sometimes that happens by finding things in his reports that match with our own thinking, sometimes it happens by contrast, and sometimes it happens because he mentions possibilities that one would never in a million years think of by oneself. The positions he takes throw light upon our own, even when we don't see things the same way. I find that very helpful.

 

 

The greatest danger is that we should "believe" Clif, "have faith" in Clif, or "obey" what we think he's saying. Those are the terms that describe religious stances that are fundamental to Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. If we are taking Clif like he is a guru or spiritual leader, then that could clearly pose a problem, because he's not, nor is he trying to be.

 

I'm comfortable with the ambiguity, but that's because I have a very schooled intuition. I trust my body's estimation, which is that Clif's motive is good. Because of that, I listen. If I didn't hear that in his voice, however, I'd not take the time.

 

By one impulse alone are you impressed.

Oh, never learn to know the other!

Two souls alas! are dwelling in my breast;

And each is fain to leave its brother.

The one, fast clinging, to the world adheres

With clutching organs, in love's sturdy lust;

The other strongly lifts itself from dust

To yonder high, ancestral spheres.

Oh, are there spirits hovering near,

That ruling weave, twixt earth and heaven are rife,

Descend! come from the golden atmosphere

And lead me hence to new and varied life!

Yea! were a magic mantle only mine,

To bear me to strange lands at pleasure,

I would not barter it for costliest treasure,

Not for the mantle of a king resign.

 

Goethe, Dr. Faust

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Context: Nextlevel ****. “From Science-fiction to Fiction-science” (link to thread on private forum section).

 

''Science-fiction, whether in Jules Verne or H.G. Wells or in the pulp magazine varieties common on newsstands, is a legitimate enough art form.

 

When done well, the value of the genre is that, in treating the remotely possible or conceivable as if it had already occurred, it helps prepare the reader for the shape of things to come. (Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, for example, was written in 1869.) But good science-fiction is not too common. Much of it today is written hastily and according to formula, to meet the unceasing demands of the pulps.''

 

Samuel Ichiye “S.I.” Hayakawa, “From Science-fiction to Fiction-science”. In the journal ETC: A Review of General Semantics, vol. VIII, No. 4 SUMMER 1951 BOOK REVIEWS

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